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November 3, 2016

By Ava

Once upon a time there was a princess named Ava, and she had sisters named Lily and Clara. Her mom and dad were thinking about a party for her. And then she went outside so her parents couldn't see her.

And then she decided to make a birthday cake for herself. And then there was a monster. That monster almost got her, but it was only a person.

It was one of her sisters. It was Clara. And Lily was a princess, so she went back into the castle, and she started writing. And then there was another thing that she wanted to add to it. Her sister was in the picture.

October 27, 2016
Ava and Lily at a fall festival

By Ava

Once upon a time, there was a princess whose name was Ava. And then there was a horse. And then the horse had a prince on it. And then the prince told the princess how to do art. And then she already made art. And then she showed the prince her art project.

THE END

April 6, 2016

Some of you are probably familiar with the Performance Against Seed Expectations (PASE) metric used with the men's tournament brackets. In short, the metric takes into account how many games a seed is expected to win based on past performances since 1985 (the first year of the 64-team tournament). I use this metric to determine expected offensive statistical totals for the college basketball fantasy league that I run each March.

July 24, 2015

With the 10th anniversary of "The Developers" happening this year (right now, in fact!), I wanted to address a sensitive issue regarding Rick Astley.

I didn't invent the rickroll, at least, not directly.

May 28, 2015

Ten years ago this month, I originally published "The Developers." It's weird to think it was that long ago, and even weirder to think that I started on the book 13 years ago, in 2002. While so much has changed with the Internet, the key tenets of the book seemingly still hold true:

1. The Internet is a social place.
2. Governments and corporations are always watching.

Then again, I guess these items are relevant in real-life situations as well. It's just much easier to track people (definitely as a group but also as individuals) online.

From the Archive

September 4, 2008

I will be making three book appearances in September, marking my first events since the early summer. Yeah, work and other things have gotten in the way! First, on Sept. 13, I will be selling books and raising money for the Waverly branch of Baltimore's Pratt Library. I'll also be there doing a little volunteer work, as I tutor at the Waverly library on a weekly basis.

August 6, 2005

As online purchasing and window shopping becomes more prevalent, seeing what other people think about particular products has grown in popularity as well.

True, not every website out there has online reviews. For instance, I've yet to read any reviews on the Weather Channel ("Man, your weather sucks!" or "That lightning storm was great, but we could have done without the exploding generator."). In the meantime, many sites that sell a variety of products are turning to the consumer to hawk their products.

February 20, 2020

The book is out! The Special Delivery is available directly through me and Amazon.

Raymond and Damon are not typical caimans. Sure, they look like small alligators, and they are fierce - at baking cakes, making paint and selling their great wares at affordable prices. Today is a “special” day for Raymond and Damon. Let’s ride along with them and find out more about their delivery adventure!

June 5, 2007

If you just read the headline of this story, maybe you thought "Man, that sucks that I won't be able to open documents in five states. Then again, if I get a job in one of those states, I guess I won't have to stare at a computer screen all day." Before I continue, let me explain what open document format is.

September 15, 2004

If you've ever seen a recipe in a cookbook, you've probably noticed how complicated the instructions can be. (Eds. note: If you have never seen a recipe, you might want to never admit that in public, or at least, never while you are serving any type of casserole to a large group of hungry sumo wrestlers.) Cooking For Engineers makes fixing new dishes a breeze by displaying the directions in an easy-to-use, moderately graphical format.