Books coming to Owensboro

I haven't had a book event in some time, so I'm headed over to Owensboro on July 1 to catch up with friends and sign a few copies of Corporate Ties. From 6-7 pm, show up at Gambrinus Libation Emporium for a free book with a $10 purchase. If you already have a book, stop by and meet the family!

Whoa, what? I have a website?

For my first post in 2013, I thought I'd remind myself that I have a website. I guess it's tough to post as much as I used to now that I have a new baby and all. I have a few updates coming soon with a book event or two, but other than that, I'm just staying busy with my day job. I guess I should sign off until I have something more relevant to offer.

Book party the day after Christmas!

Just in case you missed the invite ... party 4-7 p.m. December 26 in Louisville!

Kentucky Book Fair - I don't understand

The 2012 Kentucky Book Fair begins today in Frankfort, and, well, I'm not sure if anyone knows or even cares. The idea of a book fair in Kentucky certainly appeals to me, as it should all book-lovers.

Back in 2006, I submitted "The Developers" for a spot in the fair, but I was declined. I assumed I submitted late, or perhaps there just weren't that many spots. However, after seeing photos of the actual event, and noticing the lack of media coverage, I thought that maybe it just wasn't very big and no one actually attended.

Election wrapup

Mitt Romney and Barack Obama

The U.S. elections are finally over, and either you're elated, frustrated or somewhere in between (maybe your guy/girl won the big race, but that bond issue for building a life-size replica of the Millennium Falcon in your basement didn't quite make it). Following the races, specifically the presidential race, on TV, the web, Twitter, etc., was a somewhat dizzying experience. With the electoral votes changing rapidly, the election almost seemed like a basketball or football game, with continual highs and lows as the totals were revealed.

Pages

Random News

Book featured at recent Owensboro club meeting

I recently found out that a friend of mine, Fred Miller, used "The Developers" as a topic of discussion at the March 17, 2006, meeting of the Investigators Club of Owensboro, Ky. According to Miller, it is a literary club (the oldest in Kentucky as far as he can tell) that has been meeting once a month since 1892. Every two years each of its 24 members is responsible for presenting an "Original Topic" paper, a "Scientific Topic" paper, a book report and host the meeting. He thought it would be a neat idea to review a book written by a local author.

Compromise might be in store for Internet radio

The deadline has past, but Internet radio is still on. Maybe it will stay that way for a little while longer.

Negotiations are still rolling since SoundExchange, which is the overseer of recording industry royalty fees, agreed to continue searching for new rates. The biggest issue, it seems, is coming to a suitable compromise between large and small webcasters. It appears that some of the major players, like Time Warner and Yahoo! will have to pay the royalties, just like everyone else.

Book review: "The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair

Nearly everyone I have talked to has heard of Upton Sinclair, a muckraker at the turn of the 20th Century. And more often than that, people have heard of "The Jungle," one of his masterpieces. Yet I have not encountered a single person who has read the book, nor anyone who knows more about the book than its focus on the meat-packing industry.

Stop AOL from trying to levy taxes on emails

AOL has had its moments over the years, but attempting to level a tax on sending email is just a bit over the top. Fortunately, with the help of MoveOn.org, there's an online petition you can sign to thwart this from starting.

The organization has created Our Open Letter to AOL to help prohibit AOL and other ISPs from setting a tax on emails. Let's face it: Would you pay to send an email?

From form to fame

There are thousands of way to make your Webpage interactive these days, from Java applets to Flash to sticking your head through your computer screen and giving the monitor a twirl. But today we will be discussing forms, one of the most elementary ways to conduct hand-to-hand combat on the Internet warfront.

Pages

Subscribe to Front page feed